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The Numbers Prove it was an Incredible Game by the Bolts Defense 

Now that's more like it.

The Los Angeles Chargers defense faced a stiff test Sunday, going up against an Oakland offense ranked second in the NFL in total offense, fourth in passing, 15th in rushing and 13th in points.

They passed with flying colors.

That second-ranked offense averaging 441.8 yards per game?

Completely held in check, churning out basically half that amount with 289 yards on the day.

The rushing attack averaging 108.8 yards per game?

Held to a mere 41 yards.

A passing attack averaging 333.0 yards through the air?

The Chargers limited Derek Carr and company to just 268.

Those 24.3 points per game they've been scoring?

The Bolts held them to less than half that.

Overall, the Bolts allowed under 300 net yards for the eighth time under Defensive Coordinator Gus Bradley and for the second time this season. To no one's surprise, L.A. is 8-0 in those games.

Yes, this is the defense the Chargers expect to see on a routine basis, and one Adrian Phillips thinks we'll see more of as the year goes on. As he explains, this is the time of year last season when the unit really found its groove.

"We kind of started off shaky like this last year, too," said Phillips. "Around this time, around a few games, that's where we kind of turned it on, and I think we're starting to hit our stride again. The main thing is we've got to keep building on this. We've got to go back to the film room. We made a few mistakes out there, (so) we just make sure we don't carry those mistakes over again."

The Chargers are proud of their bend but don't break defense that's a trademark of Defensive Coordinator Gus Bradley. After all, limiting damage to field goals instead of touchdowns not only keeps points off the board, but also frustrates the opposition.

That goes tenfold when you are able to force turnovers when backed up near the goal line.

For the third-straight game, the Chargers picked off a pass either at or in the end zone. Two weeks ago, it was Derwin James while last week it was Trevor Williams. On Sunday, Melvin Ingram intercepted Derek Carr in the middle of the end zone late in the third quarter. 

The play took the wind out of the Raiders' sails, completely deflating Oakland's offense.

"It's so cliché, but it's so true," explained Phillips. "Bend but don't break. It doesn't matter. If an offense comes to the red zone five or six times and they're getting three or we're getting picks and turnovers, it frustrates them. It drives them crazy. We can see it. The quarterback gets antsy because he wants to make a play so badly. Go back and watch the film. You'll see that as soon as Melvin caught the pick, Marshawn (Lynch) yanked his helmet off. It deflates them."

Jahleel Addae echoed those very same sentiments down to a tee.

"We did well," he said. "They got down in the red zone, but the mentality for us is bend don't break. It is really cliché, but it's true."

For all those reasons and more, Head Coach Anthony Lynn was emphatic in his praise for the Bolts' defense.

"I thought our defense did a hell of a job on third downs getting off the field," he said, referring to the Bolts limiting Oakland to 4-of-11 efficiency (36 percent) on the money down. "That's something we've been strong with. Today, I thought they did a hell of a job…. That was a powerful offense. That team has been (totaling) a lot of yards this year (and) scoring a lot of points. We got them off the field for the first half. They were zero percent on third downs in the first half."

Lynn also was quick to laud the team for forcing those turnovers when defending their end zone, explaining how it's a mindset indicative of their never say die attitude.

"We'll play some of that bend but don't break," he said. "When we get in the red zone, our team is pretty stingy."

View the best game action shots as the Bolts battle the Oakland Raiders for the annual "Crucial Catch" game supporting Breast Cancer Awareness.

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